Tag Archives: behaviour

Dogs are twice as friendly to humankind as previously thought, suggests study

Humankind’s long friendship with the dog may have begun at least twice. Grey wolves in western Eurasia may have started hanging around Stone Age hunter-gatherer clans even before humans and dogs clinched the relationship perhaps 14,000 years ago in east Asia.

New research based on DNA samples from prehistoric hounds, as well as genetic studies of modern dogs and wolves, suggests that two populations of grey wolves – separated by thousands of miles and thousands of years – may have begun the connection that turned Canis lupus into Canis lupus familiaris.

The scientists say in the journal Science that their scenario remains hypothetical. Researchers have been arguing about the origins of the spaniel, the terrier and the collie for more than a decade.

“Animal domestication is a rare thing and a lot of evidence is required to overturn the assumption that it happened just once in any species,” said Professor Greger Larson, one of the authors and the director of the Wellcome Trust palaeogenomics and bio-archaeology research network at Oxford University.

Our ancient DNA evidence, combined with the archaeological record of early dogs, suggests that we need to reconsider the number of times dogs were domesticated independently. Maybe the reason there hasn’t been a consensus about where dogs were domesticated is because everyone has been a little bit right.”

The domestication of cattle, sheep and goats began with the first farm settlements in the Fertile Crescent at the end of the last Ice Age 10,000 years ago. The only animal known to have been domesticated twice is the pig, in both east Asia and the near East. The same story might be true for Rover and Fido. If so, grey wolves must have started hanging around human settlements for food scraps: the step from scavenger to hunting companion would have taken many generations.

For the full article go to the Guardian

Hound takes seventh place in Alabama half marathon

Runners in a half marathon must have thought they had gone barking mad when an Alabama dog got ‘fur-ther’ than expected and finished in the top 10, a paw-some performance. Ludivine, a two-and-a-half-year-old hound dog, snuck out of her owner’s yard in Elkmont, Alabama, on 16 January and wandered to the starting area of the town’s inaugural half marathon, the Trackless Train Trek.

Along with 165 runners, Ludivine then ran the half marathon, finishing in seventh place (unofficially speaking), despite wandering off during portions of the race to mingle with cheerleaders on the trail and to examine a rabbit’s carcass. Her owner, April Hamlin, did not realize Ludivine had even left the yard until friends who were volunteering at the race texted her photos of her dog.

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Ways to know your dog loves you

25 ways you know your dog loves you

Dogs don’t sleep upside down

An episode of QI from a couple of years ago included the statement that dogs don’t sleep upside down. Well that’s just ridiculous – as any dog owner would know.  Here is Couscous from yesterday afternoon. I’m watching tv and she’s snoring away on my lap – upside down.

Dogs dont sleep upside down comp

Your enemy’s enemy is your dog, scientists find

Research appears to show dogs will snub people who are mean to their owners.

Read the full article here.

Dog psychology

Dogs feel jealous of rival pets

Researchers in the US studied 36 dogs and found that most were indifferent when their owners ignored them and read aloud from a children’s pop-up book. But when the owners showered their attention on a stuffed dog – or even played with a bucket with a face painted on the side – the dogs’ behaviour changed dramatically…

Dogs and humans

Beyond simply being hairy, smelly love machines, a growing body of research shows that dogs may be even more in tune with us than we previously thought…

Dogs: an uncomplicated relationship.

History lesson

New research sheds light on the evolution of dogs

The first dogs descended from wolves about 14,000 years ago but according to Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods humans didn’t domesticate dogs — dogs sought out humans and domesticated us…

Ancient dogs

The evidence for dogs being part of human family life goes back to at least the Ancient Egyptians. A description is given in a forthcoming British Museum publican BMSAES, by W. Vivian Davis, of the Tomb of Sataimau. Notable among the pharaonic monuments at Hagr Edfu is a group of three tombs, located at the foot of the main hill which were uncovered by the Egyptian Antiquities Service in 1941. One of the tombs belongs to a high official named Sataimau and is dated by inscription to the reign of Amenhotep I. In the tomb-chapel of Sataimau, in the First chamber, on the North and south walls is the following:
“The focal scene is that on the north wall showing the seated figures of tomb-owner and wife surrounded by their offspring (and a pet dog), before a pile of offerings. “

Read my mind

Reading dog’s thoughts

A new study at Emory University is trying to figure out what dogs think. The study uses functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to scan the dogs’ brains while they’re shown different stimuli…